6 Foot Bullwhip Progress

6 Foot Bullwhip Progress

I’ve finished all of the internal layers of this bullwhip and have the overlay cut out.

Here’s the core with four plait belly attached:

how to make a bullwhip

Here’s the inner belly braided:

how to make a bullwhip

Then I put on another bolster and braided a second 4 plait belly.  On top of the second belly goes a second bolster:
bullwhip plaited belly

Then I cut out the 8 plait overlay:

8 PLAIT KANGAROO

This whip should be finished tomorrow and ready to ship out!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

6 Foot Bullwhip

6 Foot Bullwhip

I started work on a 6 foot bullwhip.  This will will have an 8 plait overlay.  I went up to David Morgan and picked up a 58 dm kangaroo skin for this:

how to make a bullwhip

Here’s the skin trimmed and the core cut out:

how to make a bullwhip

Here’s the inner belly cut out:

how to make a bullwhip

Today I should be able to get the inner layers of this bullwhip completed.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Plaited Kangaroo Apple Watch Band

Plaited Kangaroo Apple Watch Band

Now for the actual making of the Apple Watch band.  The first step was to get some connectors to attach the watch face to the watch band.  I got these on Amazon:
apple watch connector

The watch band buckle came from a local leather shop.

I cut out the flat part and did the edge braiding.  The flat part is actually two pieces of kangaroo skin, they are glued together on the flesh side. Then I did the braiding that would make up the actual watch band.  I used the Pyramid pattern I found in a Ron Edwards book called  Little Snake:

All of the Ron Edwards books are great, and are worth checking out.

ron edwards plaiting book

Here’s the finished watch:

Plaited kangaroo apple watch band
Plaited kangaroo apple watch band

I like, and I get a lot of compliments on it!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Making an Apple Watch Band

Making an Apple Watch Band

I got an Apple Watch recently and I don’t like the band it comes with, so I decided I’m going to try to make my own. I remember seeing David Morgan wear a watchband that was kangaroo and I remember seeing it an old David Morgan catalog, but couldn’t find it on their website.

A quick drive up to visit everyone at David Morgan and we found an old catalog that had it listed:

David Morgan Catalog

For some reason I thought they made them in house, but they were imported from Australia.  Not only did they find the catalog for me to look at, they also managed to find a couple of the watch bands!  One was new and one was used:

Here’s the front and back of the used one:
Plaited Leather Watch Band Plaited Leather Watch Band

And here’s the new one:

Plaited Leather Watch BandPlaited Leather Watch BandPlaited Leather Watch Band
As you can see it’s a pretty simple design.  It’s got the plaited strap, then the flat leather part.  I don’t know the technical name for the leather part that’s not plaited, so I’ll just call it the flat leather part. You can see it’s got some edge plaiting on the flat leather part.  I don’t do a lot of edge plaiting, so I looked it up in Bruce Grant’s book Encyclopedia of Rawhide and Leather Braiding and to my surprise I found the same watch band and the picture was supplied by David Morgan!

Bruce Grant leather book

Will Morgan was nice enough to show me an early edition of the book that Bruce autographed to David Morgan:

Bruce Grant leather book   Bruce Grant leather book

Now that I had my foundation, it was time to make the actual watch band, we’ll get into that in another post.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

From the Mail Bag…

From the Mail Bag…

Here’s a email I got and I figured the answers would be relevant to some others:

“I’ve made a couple whips before and they turned out alright. But I’ve been asked to make an Aussie stock whip for a girl from Australia. Any tips or advice? And what is your take on saddle soap as a conditioner and plaiting agent? Thank you for any advice you might have.”

Let’s start out with a general thought about making stock whips:

A basic stock whip is a lot easier to make than a bullwhip.  

While I don’t know the length you are going for, there’s a great pattern for making a stock whip in David Morgan’s book Whips and Whip Making.  If you basically follow that and adjust it based on the length of the whip you should do fine.

Next up is using saddle soap.  I personally do not use it, the main reason is I can’t stand the smell.  Every brand I’ve tried stinks!  There are other valid reasons to not use saddle soap as plaiting soap and as conditioner.

First for plaiting, you really can’t beat using soap and lard.  You can find the recipe for making this in David Morgan’s book Braiding Fine Leather (I think it’s also in Whips and Whip Making).  Soap and lard is much cheaper than buying saddle soap, and it’s usually much easier to buy, as you can get everything you need from the grocery store.

Now as for using saddle soap as a conditioner.  Yes, it has some stuff in it that’s good for leather, but it also has stuff in it that’s bad for leather.  Products like Pecard’s Leather Dressing and Fiebing’s Aussie Conditioner are generally accepted as better for kangaroo.  The nice thing about products like Pecard’s is that it’s ready to go, you don’t need to add water.  You can throw a small tub of it in your whip bag and you can add conditioner to that fall you didn’t realize was dried out when you are at the park cracking your whips.

Hope that helps!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

 

8 foot stock whip

8 foot stock whip

My current project is making an 8 foot stock whip.  This whip will have a 12 plait handle and an 8 plait lash. I’m starting with a 61 decimeter kangaroo skin that I picked up yesterday at David Morgan.

stock whip

For the handles I’m using a fiberglass stock whip handle.  I got a bunch of these many years ago from David Morgan, they had surplus’d them.

stock whip

Today I should get the handle finished and hopefully get all of the leather cut out for the lash.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org