Stock Whip Repairs

Stock Whip Repairs

Recently I have two stock whips come in for a repair.

stock whip repair

The first whip needed a new keeper:

stock whip repair
stock whip repair

The first step in replacing the keeper was cutting off the old one:
stock whip repair

Then I put a new keeper on, and it’s good to go:
stock whip repair

The second stock whip needed a keeper and a fall.  I started with replacing the keeper:

stock whip repair
So I cut off the old one:
stock whip repair
And put an new one on:
stock whip repair
While I was putting the lash onto the handle, I noticed the lash’s keeper was torn pretty bad:
stock whip repair
I called the owner and we talked about a couple of options and we decided to sew around the tear to add strength to the whip:

stock whip repair

And the whip is now back in crackin’ shape!
stock whip repair
These are in the mail back to their new owner.

If you’ve got a whip that needs a repair, feel free to contact me and we can chat about fixing it.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Finished (?) Alligator Handle Bullwhip

Finished (?) Alligator Handle Bullwhip

Yesterday finished working on the bullwhip with the alligator handle.  However I did the knots with a second color interweave and I’m not sure that I like it, so I might be redoing them.

The work that was done yesterday was finishing plaiting the point:

bull whip

This bullwhip is a 12 plait bullwhip and since it has an exotic leather handle I decided to give it a finer point than a usual 6 plait point and went with an 8 plait point.  Also I started doing a couple of newish things to this bullwhip and one old thing.

The old thing that I did was something that I used to do a long time ago and for some reason stopped.  What I’m going again is a little bit before strand drops I’m starting to taper the strands that will be dropped a little bit.  That seems to ease the lace into the drop a little bit better.

The two new things that I’m doing are:

  1. Different Angles of Paring: The lace that makes up this bullwhip starts out at the handle pared at an angle, but as you move toward the point the lace ends up more square.  My thinking on this is that when you use a whip if it’s pared at an angle the lace at that thinner spot is more susceptible to abrasion damage which can turn into a torn or broken lace on the thinner point strands.  By having them more square they should hold up to that a bit better.    However since the first half of the whip doesn’t normally contact the ground abrasive damage isn’t really an issue.
  2. Splitting By Hand: I’ve come up with my own technique for splitting lace by hand (no splitter).  I’ll make a little video of this some day, but it’s pretty easy and right now it’s fun to do…we’ll see if I keep it up once the novelty has worn off!

Yesterday I also put the knots on the bullwhip.  Here’s the transition knot before the interweave:

bullwhip

and after the interweave:

bullwhip

And here’s the heel knot foundation ready for a knot:

bullwhip

And here’s the finished heel knot:

Alligator bullwhip

Part of my “not sure if I like it” I think may come from the unbalanced look of the knots.  I need to do them in one solid color, add more red to the heel knot, or less red to the transition knot.
Here’s a full view of the whip:

bull whip

I still need to roll and shellac it after I come to a decision as to whether or not I like the knots.  The more I look a them the more I’m OK with them…but still not positive!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

More Thinking About Falls…

More Thinking About Falls…

Lately I’ve been thinking about bullwhip falls and today in between shows I was rereading part of David Morgan’s Whips and Whipmaking.  In the part of his book about the thong of the bullwhip he talking about the appropriate type of fall and fall hitch for a bullwhip.  One thing he says is that you want the thinnest fall hitch as possible so that it doesn’t affect the taper of the whip.

That go me thinking about the bullwhips with the “Texas Style” falls and how they can’t be very areodynamic.  Going from the thinner point of the whip to a wider fall can’t be very efficiant for increasing the speed of the whip when cracking.  I guess that’s why most makers use the australian style falls.

Below is an example of a Texas style fall.

bullwhip fall

All that got me thinking more and more about other things like cracker attachment, but I’ll save that discussion for another day.

Louie

10 foot KotCS bullwhip

10 foot KotCS bullwhip

Yesterday I started work on a 10 foot KotCS bullwhip.  I’ve got one belly plaited and hopefully I’ll find the time to get the 2nd one done today.

10 foot bullwhip

I’m out of town this weekend, so I’m going to get any bullwhip work done until Monday.

The new method that I’m using to prepare my falls looks like it’s a keeper!  They are ending up being supple and I think I’m getting good penetration of the dressing into the whitehide fall.

Louie

http://bullwhips.org