Whip Repairs…

Whip Repairs…

Recently I’ve had a bunch of whips come in for new falls and repairs.  I think it’s due to the weather getting better and people are going out to crack whips and remembering that fall they forgot to change in September.

If you have a whip that needs a new fall or repair you can get more info on those services by clicking here.

 

These three lashes needed new falls:

 

Stock Whip

Stock Whip

Here they are after the falls were put on:

Stock Whip

Stock Whip

This handle needed the keeper replaced:

hunt whip

fox hunting whip

Unfortunately I can’t find the picture of it with new keeper. When I find it I’ll post it.

Louie

 

From the Mailbag…

From the Mailbag…

Here’s an email I got recently:

I have a 10′ snake whip I just finished, came out beautiful, my first one. I have tried it and can only get little pops from it intermittently, I was wondering if it might be the length of the fall or cracker or both, could you tell me what the lengths should be for both of these and how many strands should I use in the cracker?

Thanks for the email and when a whip doesn’t crack right, there are basically two things that will cause that:

#1 Operator Error

#2 Equipment Error

I’m going to assume the person knows how to crack a whip properly and isn’t trying to “dish rag” it.  So that brings us to #2 equipment error.   In my opinion there is no one length for a fall or number of strands for the cracker that is correct.  You can get a great crack with a whip that has an extremely short or long fall, and you can get a great crack out of a whip that has a very heavy or light fall.  Heck you can even get a decent crack from a whip that has no fall.

Every whip will like slightly different fall.  When I started I would cut my falls at 3 feet and put them on the whip. I’d take it to the park and start cracking it.  I would then cut the fall shorter and shorter to find the length that I liked.  Pretty simple…just trial and error.  If what is failing is the fall, you’ll quickly find the perfect fall length for the whip.

As for the cracker for simply getting a good crack, this probably isn’t the problem.  As for how many strands, it depends on what you are using.  Right now I have a spool of lighter nylon and it takes twice the number of strands that I use when I use heavier nylon.  The easy way to find what is right for what you are using is to make three crackers.   Make one that’s what you think you should have, then make one that’s heavier and one that’s lighter.   Put the middle one on the whip and crack it a bit.  Then try the other two…which cracked the best?  Use that one.  You can take it a step further if the one that cracked the best was the light or heavy one.  You can then make another cracker a step further in that direction and see if that works even better!

After experimenting with different falls and crackers and the whip’s performance doesn’t improve, then you need to look at the internal construction of your whip.   Is it efficiently moving energy down the lash of the whip?  A couple places to think about are:

Is it braided tightly?  If the braid isn’t tight on all the braided layers, the energy travelling down the whip is hitting speed bumps slowing it down and making it hard to crack.

Is your core dense?  Since the question relates to a snake whip, you are using mass instead of the leverage a handle would give you to put the initial energy into the whip.  If you core is lead, but not well packed, or of a huge diameter, then the energy is once again hitting speed bumps.

Is your core something other than lead?  For example ball chain is something popular for a core with many amateur nylon whip makers.  I don’t understand why you’d use ball chain as it’s hollow and doesn’t contribute weight or density to the core of the whip (but I don’t make many nylon whips), however in my opinion for a leather whip it’s useless for adding weight.

Those are just a few things to consider if the problem is beyond the fall and cracker.

Hope that helps!

Louie

Learn to Make a Bullwhip DVD

Learn to Make a Bullwhip DVD

I’m working on finishing up a project I started a couple of months ago while I was travelling in the midwest.  It’s DVD that will teach you how to make a basic beginners bullwhip.  The pattern I’m using is pretty simple, it’s a core, plaited belly and 4 plait overlay.


This DVD assumes you’ve never made a whip before, and takes you step by step through the entire process.  Everything used in it was sourced in one shopping trip to a Tandy Leather Factory and an Ace Hardware.  However you could get the same materials from pretty much any leather shop and hardware store.

The DVD was recorded while I was travelling, so I’m making the whip in hotel rooms.  I did this on purpose because I wanted to come up with a way to make a whip for someone who didn’t have a whip making shop.  Since I was in a hotel room, I couldn’t screw hooks into the walls, so you’ll learn to make a whip…without committing to hanging hooks on the walls in your house!

Currently I’m doing the final editing on the Make a Beginner’s Bullwhip DVD and it is scheduled to ship out on 5/23  . This DVD will  sell for $30, however as a presale special, if you order before midnight on 5/22/16, you will save $10!  That means the Make a Beginner’s Bullwhip DVD is only $20 and I’ll include free shipping!

The DVD is $30 and to order simply click the button below to add it to you cart!

Then click the “Cart” button at the top of the page to complete checkout!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Beginner’s Bullwhips!

Beginner’s Bullwhips!

I’ve had some extra time the last couple of weeks and used that time to make a couple of the Beginner’s Bullwhips.  These bullwhips are made of cowhide (mostly).  They have a leather core, 4 plait belly and 4 plait overlay.  The knots are kangaroo.
beginners bullwhip bull whip inexpensive bullwhip

All of these whips are 6 feet long.  I just listed them on the IN STOCK whips page.  There are only three…you can get one, two or all three.

Louie

Bullwhip Making on the Road…

Bullwhip Making on the Road…

I’m currently in Pipestone, MN travelling for the most of the next 7 weeks performing my show.  This week in my hotel room I’m working on making some 4 plait beginner’s bullwhips.

bull whips

I’m working on making six of these bullwhips in cowhide.  Currently I have most of them cut out, and should be able to get started plaiting tomorrow.  Over the summer I perfected my “Hotel Whip Workshop” technique and have come up with a very simple way to make whips in a hotel room.

I’m thinking I might make a video of making one of these whips and offer it as an into to whip making.  You can get all of the needed supplies for cheap at a hardware store and you don’t need a lot of space, so I think it’d be a good lesson for “urban” whip makers.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Bullwhip in the Works…

Bullwhip in the Works…

Currently I’m working on a 10 foot 12 plait bullwhip built in the style of the Indiana Jones Bullwhip.  For this whip at 10 feet it’s hard to find one skin that is big enough to make the whole whip out of, so I’m staring with two skins.  I made a quick trip up to David Morgan to pick through their skins and pick out two that will work for this project.

bullwhip

Both of these skins are in the low 50 decimeter size.  One will be the two bellies and the other will be some lace and the 12 plait overlay.

Here’s the finished inner belly:

bull whip

And here’s the completed interior of the bullwhip:

bullwhip

Finally for today I cut out the 12 plait overlay and lace for the wrist loop.

whip

Tomorrow the real work starts, and that’s doing the strand prep and beginning to plait the overlay.  The interior is much easier to do that the final layer.

Oh, while at David Morgan I always have to drool over the shop whip:

bull whip

If I recall correctly, this is an 8 foot bullwhip and it’s amazing!

Louie