Unique Way of Tying a Knot!

Unique Way of Tying a Knot!

I recently had a stock whip handle come in for a repair.  This whip belonged to someone that was a former rodeo performer.  Here’s  the handle when it got to me:

stock whip repair

Here’s the lash (he didn’t send me the lash, so I never got to see it in person):

stock whip lash

And a close up of the broken keeper:

stock whip repair

Nothing too exciting.  When I went to untie the knot, I realized what looked like a two pass knot, was actually one pass!

stock whip repair

The maker had tooled a line down the middle of the lace so that it appeared to be two pass knot!  I’d never seen this, or even considered doing it this way. They also did this with the heel knot to make it appear to be a three pass, when it was only one:

stock whip repair

To make this a more fun repair for me, I decided I was going to try to replicate the lace that was on the stock whip handle.  My first attempt was to take my fid and run it down the middle of a piece of lace.  It was a lot of work and turned out really sloppy and I forgot to take pictures of it.

For the second attempt I dug out  my lace cutter and had the blade barely poke out and ran a piece of lace over it.

leather lace cutter

This did work, but upon comparing it to the original lace it wasn’t what the original maker did. Also the slit in the lace was so thin, it really won’t show up until the whip gets used a bit and it gets dirty in the slit.

turkshead knot

My next idea was to use the tool in the picture below (I don’t know what the tool is called) and cut a little channel in  the leather lace:

turkshead knot

It took me two tries to get the channel straight, but it ended up working out and I think this is the method that it looks like the original maker used. Here’s how mine turned out:

stock whip repair stock whip repair

If you had some sort of tool that you ran the lace over and were mass producing whips, this would be an effective way to save some time.  Obviously it only works if everything is pretty much the same size.  Based on how this whip was made, the maker was cranking them out, and not concerned with leaving little gaps.

This stock whip handle is on the way back to it’s owner!

Louie

http://bullwhips.org

Garage Sale!

Garage Sale!

I’m cleaning out my shop and I’m selling a book set that I don’t use anymore.  It was helpful for me in learning to understand how to make turkshead knots and is a great resource for anyone wanting to learn to tie different types of knots.

Here’s what I’m selling:

turkshead cookbook

You get the Turkshead Cook Book Volume 1 and 2 along with a Knottool (tube style).  For mot details about this book set visit: http://www.knottool.com/

This is about an $80 value and it’s yours for only $50 shipped in the USA.  For delivery outside the USA change the Shipping option to “Outside the USA”   To order simply use the “Buy Now” button below!

THIS HAS BEEN SOLD

This set was custom put together for me by the author.  Normally the Turkshead Cookbook kits come with a flat Knottool this one has a tube style Knottool.  I chose this type because it visually represented the end of a whip better than the flat Knottool.

Also this doesn’t come with string and needles, I used kangaroo lace (not included) that I had cut out with this book set.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Bull Whip Heel Knot

Bull Whip Heel Knot

The 4 plait bull whip that I made for myself a few weeks ago for a specific trick has taken quite a beating!  In this particular trick the heel knot is getting hit on the ground a lot and with quite a bit of force.  This is a very unusual type of stress for the butt of the whip and most whips will never take the abuse that I’ve given this whip in the last few weeks in their lifetime.

As a result of my practicing this trick the leather cap that goes over the butt of the handle had worn out and the end of the spike was poking through.  This was a strictly cosmetic damage and didn’t change the function of the whip at all.  Unfortunately I forgot to take a picture of it before I started my repair.  The fix was simple I added another leather cap over the one that was wearing out and put a new knot over it.

I didn’t remove the old leather cap before I added the new one, so the heel knot is slightly larger than before.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Plaited YoYo Holder!

Plaited YoYo Holder!

Here’s a fun little custom project, it’s a plaited yoyo holder!

yo yo holder yoyo-holder_3_050313 yoyo-holder_1_050313

It’s not a very complex project, simply a 4 plait  that’s back braided to form a loop.  I put a knot over the back braided part.  Then I made a knot that slides up and down to make the loop bigger or smaller to  hold the yoyo.

This was a fun little quick project!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

 

At The Fair…

At The Fair…

Sorry I haven’t posted much here this summer my performing schedule has been very busy.  It slows down a bit next week and hope to be back to posting on a more regular basis.  The fair I’m performing at this week had a display on turksheads:

turkshead

turkshead

turkshead

turkshead

There was an ipad case with some edge braiding:

Edge braided ipad case

And finally here are some lights that at least to my eye seem to be turkshead inspired:

turkshead

As for progress on the Ostrich handle bullwhip I’ve got all the insides of the whip finished and the overlay strands cut out and prepped for plaiting.  I should be able to get back to working on that whip on Tuesday!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org 

Choose Your Own Bullwhip

Choose Your Own Bullwhip

Today I started a very unique and interactive bullwhip auction on ebay.  Here’s the idea:

During the course of a 10 day auction I will build a bullwhip based on an 8 foot 12 plait framework.  The highest bidder can choose spec’s that they want for their custom bullwhip.  So if the highest bidder would like it 16 plait with no wrist loop and a plaited pattern on the handle they simply contact me and I update the current listing.  However if you don’t like what the current high bidder has set for the spec’s you outbid them and contact me with what you want for the new spec.

Honestly I don’t know how people will react to this listing and I think it’s a fun experiment to see what people want in a bullwhip.  The ebay listing is live now and you can start bidding now, but work won’t start until tomorrow (3/1/12)  so that people can have a chance to bid and pic things like handle length or overall bullwhip length.

To view the auction visit: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220965764135

Louie
http://bullwhips.org 

Finished (?) Alligator Handle Bullwhip

Finished (?) Alligator Handle Bullwhip

Yesterday finished working on the bullwhip with the alligator handle.  However I did the knots with a second color interweave and I’m not sure that I like it, so I might be redoing them.

The work that was done yesterday was finishing plaiting the point:

bull whip

This bullwhip is a 12 plait bullwhip and since it has an exotic leather handle I decided to give it a finer point than a usual 6 plait point and went with an 8 plait point.  Also I started doing a couple of newish things to this bullwhip and one old thing.

The old thing that I did was something that I used to do a long time ago and for some reason stopped.  What I’m going again is a little bit before strand drops I’m starting to taper the strands that will be dropped a little bit.  That seems to ease the lace into the drop a little bit better.

The two new things that I’m doing are:

  1. Different Angles of Paring: The lace that makes up this bullwhip starts out at the handle pared at an angle, but as you move toward the point the lace ends up more square.  My thinking on this is that when you use a whip if it’s pared at an angle the lace at that thinner spot is more susceptible to abrasion damage which can turn into a torn or broken lace on the thinner point strands.  By having them more square they should hold up to that a bit better.    However since the first half of the whip doesn’t normally contact the ground abrasive damage isn’t really an issue.
  2. Splitting By Hand: I’ve come up with my own technique for splitting lace by hand (no splitter).  I’ll make a little video of this some day, but it’s pretty easy and right now it’s fun to do…we’ll see if I keep it up once the novelty has worn off!

Yesterday I also put the knots on the bullwhip.  Here’s the transition knot before the interweave:

bullwhip

and after the interweave:

bullwhip

And here’s the heel knot foundation ready for a knot:

bullwhip

And here’s the finished heel knot:

Alligator bullwhip

Part of my “not sure if I like it” I think may come from the unbalanced look of the knots.  I need to do them in one solid color, add more red to the heel knot, or less red to the transition knot.
Here’s a full view of the whip:

bull whip

I still need to roll and shellac it after I come to a decision as to whether or not I like the knots.  The more I look a them the more I’m OK with them…but still not positive!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Kangaroo Rawhide…

Kangaroo Rawhide…

Yesterday I got a bit more plaiting in on the lash of the 5 foot bullwhip (but  not much more).  However I did tie the transition knot:

bullwhip

The interweave on the turkshead is kangaroo rawhide.  I was doing something else with the rawhide and had some leftover so I did the interweave with it. This interweave will give this bullwhip a very unique look!  Rawhide (usually cow) is used for interweaves on knots in a lot of cowboy gear…but I don’t think I’ve ever seen it used in knots on a bullwhip before.  The reason it’s not used more is that it’s a pain to work with!

Louie
http://bullwhips.org

Plaiting Finished

Plaiting Finished

Yesterday I finished plaiting the overlay and attaching the fall to the 8 foot bullwhip that I’m working on:

bullwhip

I also tied the transition knot:

bullwhip

The next step for this bullwhip will be to build the heel knot foundation and after that I’ll tie the final turks head.  Then it’s time for the bullwhip to be rolled, shellac’d and shipped.

Louie
http://bullwhips.org